Sunday, 20 June 2010

Attention Heiko and Mr H!

...I need your help identifying some "weeds"!  And anyone else who visits my blog who can tell me what these are.  They are growing in my garden and I don't want to keep weeding them out if I can use them

I bought Richard Mabey's book while I was in England, but I'm still not confident enough to identify them myself.

My pictures of course are nowhere near as good as his, but maybe you can see what they are?  The one above...I just have no idea.



I think...at least I hope...that this could be fennel?
Now I do know what the Turkish name for this is...it's semizoto.  And it is used in salads, also boiled and mixed with garlic and yogurt, and cooked like spinach.  But I can't find a translation for it.  This is growing in abundance in my garden, and I'll never be able to use it all, so I offload a fair amount to my neighbour Şevke.  So does anyone know an English name for it?



And just a few more pics I took this morning while I was out watering the garden.   My very first apple from a baby tree. The first lemon. The plums ripening nicely.  And the vast quantity of grapes on the vine...not quite ready.  There so many that I will be drying them out on the roof at some point...to use for cooking cakes, etc.


















19 comments:

  1. Ok starting with the easy one. The English name for number 3 is purslane. As to number 1, I'm pretyy sure it's nothing edible. Number 2 doesn't look like fennel, but give it a rub and smell it. It should give off a distinct aniseed smell. The leaves on the pic look slightly fleshy. They should be really fine and feathery. Look up the description for tansy in Richard Mabey's book to see if it matches.

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  2. Oh...purslane! Thanks Heiko.
    OK I've given the plant a rub and there is a strong smell but I can't quite make out if it's aniseed. The leaves are fine and feathery. I've looked at Tansy in the book and this should give off a smell of chest ointment. Now I can't quite make out whether it's this or aniseed that I can smell. I'll try again later.
    Thanks Heiko xx

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  3. I always wondered why they don't grow limes in Turkey. And I mean LIMES, not unripened lemons.

    At least, I haven't seen any grown here- am I missing the annual lime harvests every year?

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  4. I would love to be able to help you but I'm afraid that I am completely crap when it comes to gardening (honestly, the last time I was weeding I had to ask our neighbour which were plants and which were weeds!!)

    Hope you get the answers your looking for

    C x

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  5. Nomad: Well if you're missing them..so am I. I'll own up to thinking that limes WERE just unripe lemons...until I tried an unripe lemon from one of my trees..now I know they're not!

    Carol: That's me too..completely crap! I also don't know the difference between weeds and plants. Heiko seems to have answered my question for me. The semizoto (or purslane) was being yanked out by me last year and thrown in a heap until my neighbour told me what it was. The only thing I seem to be any good at is watering...at least the trees and vines are proof that this is the case.

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  6. I concur with Heiko on the purslane and possible fennel and think that #1 is pigweed (maybe) a member of the Amaranth family. IF we are right, all of your weeds are edible.:)

    By the way, thank you for the award! Sorry I am so slow to read everyones posts these days.

    I am very jealous of those grapes, they look fantastic.

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  7. I think no. 1 is a sort of amaranth too..it is a real pain in my garden.

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  8. The grapes look heaven sent! How wonderful to have them in such abundance.

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  9. Amaranth, now there's a point. I can't even grow it from seed let alone have it as a weed. So never seen it in real life!

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  10. Also, if that is fennel the small fronds and seed pods should have a licorice like flavor to them.:)

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  11. Mr H: I'm so excited to discover that everything is edible..You just can't believe the amount of purslane growing in the garden! And now I've found this website with recipes. I expect you may have seen it before but just look at the opening paragraph and the benefits of this wonderful plant! Wow! It could cure all my ailments!
    http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html

    Oh and you're welcome as far as the award goes Mr H..well deserved.

    Fly: Yes I think now that this is what it is and I've just googled pigweed and it seems to grow amongst or even part of the purslane..makes sense to me now.

    Cross the Pond: That pic is just a fraction of the grapes...there are just so many. Although they look big in the pic they are actually still quite small and hard..looking forward to them ripening.

    Mr H: I've been out for another sniff and taste...and am pretty certain now that its fennel.

    Thanks everyone for your comments and advice.
    I am at last beginning to understand how exciting this all is. To make these discoveries and learn all about them is just wonderful.

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  12. Why do you think Heiko and I are so full of vim and vigor...we eat edible weeds.:)

    I had no idea purslane was so healthy, thanks for the link.

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  13. It's truly amazing stuff Mr H. I'm so impressed I've just done another post about it.

    It won't be long before I become as healthy as you and Heiko :)

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  14. Wow look at all those grapes! Drying some of them's a good idea, I usually do that with some of our figs. I chop the dried ones up and use them in fruit cakes to make the raisins go further!

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  16. Jan: My first attempt at drying grapes when we lived in Cappadocia was quite successful, so I'm confident about doing it again. I don't really like dried figs though. I made a lot of jam with the figs last year, but silly me didn't sterilise the jars properly and so much of it was wasted. I'll know better this time. Also someone (it was you wasn't it?) gave me a recipe for fig chutney which I'm looking forward to making. The figs are a bit slow this year..They were ripe before this time last year

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  17. Don't you just hate it when you've typed out and posted a comment and then realise that you addressed it to the wrong person? I wish you could edit the comments rather than deleting and re-doing.

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  18. Love the pics Ayak even though I can be of no help whatsoever lol xx

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  19. Bomb: It's ok...I won't ask you! xx

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