Friday, 24 February 2012

Goodbye washing machine

You may recall that the Beko engineer who lives in the village came out on Sunday evening to take a look at my washing machine.  It was working fine apart from one of the control buttons which was loose, and which I could fiddle with until it connected and the machine would start up and complete a cycle with no problems.

The engineer removed the outer casing and fixed the button with glue.  On Monday morning I loaded the machine, pressed the button and it started up.  It filled with water, but then things went wrong. As the washing  rotated, the machine shuddered and vibrated, moved across the room and stopped.   I unloaded, reloaded, started it up several times, always with the same result.

As I said before, and some of you agreed with me, this seems to be a common problem with repairmen.  They come out to fix one small problem and in so doing either accidentally or purposely create another. But how on earth do you prove that it wasn't just a coincidence?

The engineer returned on Wednesday evening and declared the machine dead.   Too expensive to repair.  He suggested we might as well buy a new one.   Oh and by the way did we know that his shop has a very good deal on washing machines at the moment.   And apart from the normal 3 year guarantee, you can pay an extra fee and the machine will be guaranteed for 7 years.   Mr A fell for it hook, line and sinker.  I just walked out of the room in disgust. 

What a helpful man, said Mr A, he didn't even charge us for coming out.   I responded by saying it was just as well, because if he had, it may well have resulted in my insisting that rather than US paying HIM, he might consider compensating us for killing our machine.  Of course Mr A, the most gullible man on this earth, thought I was being ridiculous.

We have discussed buying a new machine.  Mr A wants to take the engineer up on his wonderful offer.  I insist that we should go elsewhere.  It doesn't really matter anyway because we can't afford a new one at the moment.

I have reverted to what I did in the early days, when I first moved to Turkey.  We didn't have a washing machine for the first six months and I did all our washing by hand in a huge plastic bowl.  We happened to have such a bowl in the shed.  Everything gets a good soak in washing powder overnight, then I flex my muscles and wash, rinse, and squeeze.  The weather is good at the moment so a day out on the washing line and it's dry.

I'm telling myself it's good exercise, and actually I do find it quite satisfying sometimes to get back to basics.   Although I haven't tackled the bedding and towels yet...so we'll see!

16 comments:

  1. Look on the bright side- Your upper arms will be in tip-top condition for the start of the summer.
    I'm still doing the washing-up outside the back door. Hope to get our kitchen sink connected today

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  2. Hand washing bedding will be hard. :(

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  3. wow, it is really really very rare to find a woman who prefers to wash the clothes by hand rather than replacing the ex-machine. that is something very precious.

    but on the other, if our machine breaks down and my wife tells me that she will do the washing by hand rather than buying a new one, i will either do the washing myself -which is kind of unlikely- or find a way to buy a new machine, no matter how expensive it is. because my wife, or you, or any other wife in the world deserves such a treat and you are worth it.

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  4. BtoB: Oh yes the upper arms definitely need the workout. We women are so adaptable aren't we?

    Kv: Yes it will..I may have to bag it up and find a laundry in Milas

    jedilost: Ah...I didn't actually say I preferred to wash by hand! What a lovely Turkish man you are...I hope your wife appreciates you :-)

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  5. the thing that always made me livid when a repairman pulled this kind of trick was them figuring I was to stupid to know what they were up to!

    I'm not sure I'd be able to handle the handwashing of sheets and towels...it's one of those things where I'd be happy to live in the old days in a village where all the women went together to beat their clothes on the river rocks...that way my sister washerwomen would be there to help!

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  6. Ohhhh...you sure lead a life of adventure....and are very resourceful, I would just walk around in dirty clothes till I got a new machine (kidding). But you are right it is a good excercise, like I vaccum the house for excercise.

    My husband is a bit different from yours....mine bargains till they almost give it to him for free. Just to get him being so annoying out the door of the store. :-)Sometimes I'm hiding, I tell him this is a huge US store chain, not a Turkish Bazaar.

    We usually never buy any guarantees but with the new machinery and new technology and digital 'stuff' if one thing breaks the whole machine goes.
    So now we do.

    Hope you get a new machine soon, because it will be very hard hand washing all the time. Me after one hand wash I would need pain killers. :-(

    ....have a great day and don't wash too much LOL.

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  7. Theanne: Oh I think he knew that I had sussed him out.
    I'm not sure about the sheets and towels either. Maybe I should get some of my Turkish neighbours together and find a river?

    Erica: Mr A is also a very good haggler when it comes to buying anything new so hopefully when we do get a new machine we'll get a good price.
    I'm washing a few things at a time at the moment. I'm not sure it's doing the arthritis in my hands good or harm..I guess I'll find out quite soon.

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  8. No, this is a step too far.....I am very impressed that you would consider washing by hand, but personally, would rather walk on hot coals. You are clearly an amazing woman !

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  9. To be honest Janice I'm only doing what the vast majority of women in this village do and have done for years. Very few washing machines here. When in Rome...as they say!

    Oh and by the way Mr A is convinced the machine isn't entirely dead and is going to try to find someone else to have a go at fixing it tomorrow...watch this space.

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  10. Dear Ayak - I just wanted to wish Mr A good luck. Washing machines can be fixed - ours was resusitated early this year and is still going strong. And you're not in Rome; I suspect there are a lot of washing machines in that part of the world!
    Axxxx

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  11. Thanks Annie, I hope so too. Yes there are washing machines in most homes here, but honestly not many in this village..really!

    Fly: I'm keeping fingers and everything crossed that he does.

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  12. You have all my sympathy. I remember washing things by hand over the bath in one of our first flats in France and towels, jeans and towelling bathrobes are hell for your back! What about exploring some of the dry cleaners/laundries where the hotels take all their sheets and towels? We used them here beore we got the washing machine and it was surprisingly cheap.
    Vicky

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  13. Vicky that would be an excellent idea if we lived nearer a tourist area, but unfortunately there are only one or two hotels in Milas, and that's a bus ride away. We are still looking at a couple of options which would mean either the machine will be repaired or there may be a way of getting a new one. We'll know more by the end of the day.

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  14. Poor Ayak. Hope Mr A can find someone to mend it soon. When we were first married, I didn't have a washing machine and washed everything by hand including the baby's nappies. It was made easier when we were given a spin-dryer, but I didn't have a machine until we'd been married well over a year. Mind you, I was in my early 20s then and would find it very hard to have to go back to handwashing everything at my age.

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  15. Perpetua, I also didn't have a washing machine for a couple of years when I was married first time around. And then later had a spin dryer...and later still a twin tub.
    It's amazing how we take automatic washing machines, and many other appliances, for granted these days.

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