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Sunday, 4 March 2012

Sunday buses

It's nice to get out and about on a Sunday, but it's not always best to go by dolmuş.

Mr A set off to Kusadasi yesterday (Saturday) in readiness for the start of his latest job selling carpets.  This should start on 15th March but he's been asked to be available until then in case they have unexpected group bookings.  Naturally he won't start earning a salary until the official date of the 15th, but if he manages to sell anything before then, he will earn commission.  So it's better for him to be there twiddling his thumbs than here.  And it stops him spending dawn till dusk sawing and hammering lumps of wood.  

There is a wooden object that is a work in progress, a bench seat for the balcony, but that will have to wait until he's back here.

Silly man packed his suitcase before he set off, and I asked him if he had everything, and he said he had.   Actually he hadn't.  In fact he had left half a dozen essential items at home.

As it was sunny today, although still chilly, I decided to bus over to meet him and take the rest of his things.   To save a bit of time, I got the village dolmuş to Milas, then the dolmuş to Soke, which isn't too far from Kusadasi, and it saved me getting another dolmuş from Soke.

I boarded the earliest village bus, along with a dozen more people, each laden with various large containers of olives, bags of vegetables, and other things.  Sunday is the day for visiting family and the villagers never go empty-handed, so it was a tight squeeze.

I only had to wait 2 minutes at Milas for the Soke dolmuş to leave, and there were just two other passengers.   We set off at a snail's pace, collecting more and more passengers on the way, each loaded down with goodies for their families.  At one point I was forced to hang on to a large plastic container of olives between my knees as there was no other space for it.  You know, you just don't have a choice about such things in Turkey.  You just do it.  They would think you very odd if you didn't.

We gradually shed passengers as we approached Soke, until there was only one elderly lady (with lots of bags) and me.  Just before the turn-off  to the otogar, the bus driver took a left turn towards the industrial estate, while he was chatting away to the woman about where she lived.   We were in fact making a detour, which added on another 10 minutes, so that she could be dropped right outside her house.

Finally I arrived at the otogar much later than planned (almost a 2 hour journey rather than the 1hr 10mins quoted by the driver).    And because the bus from Milas to the village only runs every 2 hours on Sunday mornings, and there are only two in the afternoon...2pm and 6pm, Mr A and I had less than an hour to grab a coffee, before I set off on my return journey.  I arrived in Milas in time for the 2pm bus with just minutes to spare.

Söke isn't a particularly attractive town, unless you want to visit the large shopping outlet on the outskirts, or if you have time to see the historical site of Priene about 15 km away.   However, the journey can be pleasant, particularly the drive past Bafa Lake

I may go over there again some time.....but never on Sunday.

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18 comments:

  1. I love to hear about your travels and the differences in the buses from England. I think it is probably just as bad here on a Sunday in the country and it would be quite easy to get stuck somewhere.
    Glad Mr A got his essentials and I think you both make some lovely gestures towards each other.
    Maggie X

    Nuts in May

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    1. It's really just village buses that are scarce on Sundays Maggie. Elsewhere they seem to be the same every day.

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  2. Sounds like a journey...past the lake...to do when there is no deadline, especially if there have to be side trips to unload grannies at their door.

    What is it about men and packing!

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    1. Yes fly..one to do on a day with no time limits. It's wlorth getting off the bus at Bafa too. Spectacular scenery.
      What is it about men and most things!

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  3. Talk about a scenic tour, Ayak. I always have to pack for DH or he would forget things and just cram the rest in anyoldhow. Sigh....

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    1. I usually pack for Mr A Perpetua, so it was the exception this time. I'll stick to doing it in future.

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    1. Yes Theanne, but some I can do without!

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  5. Isn't there a song about "Never on a Sunday"? Sounds glike wise advice regarding travel in rural Turkey. Still, you certainly appear to becoming quite used to the peculiarities of living in Turkey, and that's a blessing. Glad that Mr A managed to get all his stuff in the end and I hope his new job brings everything it promises.

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    1. Thankyou parepidemos. Yes I remember that song.

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    1. BtoB. I assume you mean my new header photo? It's my neighbour.

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  7. Sounds like an amusing trip, and lovely if you dont have time pressurising you. It sounds as if you let it all drift over you, enjoying whatever came next.... a good state to be in I think.
    I love the new photo heading your page. J x

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    1. Janice. I was panicking a bit about the return journey. It's almost impossible to get to our village without the dolmuş.
      The photo is my neighbour walking her donkey and one of her cows. Not one that I took...I'm not that good a photographer.

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  8. This bus ride sounds like you went for a nice "Sunday ride". Must have been awesome scenery. I can only imagine all those people laden with all those things on the bus...yummy with those homemade olives. i think it's a real hoot with the driver going off his route to deliver a Granny in front of a home, here they would be fired.
    Men...UHG!!!! I ALWAYS pack for mine...... he would forget his head if not screwed on. When he goes himself to Turkey he always comes back with stuff he forgot to pack back home, which is normal for him. Then his sister has to mail it.

    Ahhh.... Kusadasi glad Mr. A got a job and went earlier. I let my sister in law read your Blog yesterday when she came over because years ago she went with her Mom to Kusadasi and tried to buy a carpet...well it was an adventure cause the 'carpet' seller chased them to the cruise ship...but that's a long story in itself. :-)

    ....have a great day!!!!!

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    1. Ah ...carpet sellers Erica! They are a special breed. You'll have to tell me that story one day.

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  9. Came back to see the new header photo Janice mentioned. I love it too.

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    1. Thanks Perpetua. I love it too. It is a really typical photo of life in our village.

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