Tuesday, 6 March 2012

The travelling book saga...continued

I recently wrote about the book that I won HERE so I'll just update you.

At last I have the book in my hand.   This book was originally posted by a bookshop in Istanbul.  My postbox address in Milas  was type-written correctly on the package, so I have no idea why it ended up in a cargo office in Fethiye.

The woman at the cargo office who kindly phoned my friend in Fethiye because she recognised my name, also took further initiative and forwarded it on to their office in Milas, the same day, at no extra cost.

Of course if the book had been delivered to my postbox at the Post Office it wouldn't have been a problem collecting it, because it's in the centre of town.

I had no idea where this particular cargo office was situated, so I phoned Mr A to ask if he knew.  He was certain that it was in a road behind the Tansaş supermarket in the centre of Milas, so I set off to collect it yesterday morning.

Unfortunately, it turned out to be a different cargo office entirely, and I was actually on the phone to Mr A whilst I was in the wrong cargo office.  I handed the phone over to the girl behind the desk and she spoke to Mr A to give him directions to the correct cargo office.

It turned out that it was on the outskirts of Milas, and by this time I had decided that I really couldn't be bothered to walk miles to get there, or to find a bus to take me.  So I went to the dolmuş station to get my bus back home.

The bus was crowded, and I managed to get the last available seat right at the back, and we set off.  Mr A phoned me and asked where I was.  I told him and he asked me to pass the phone to the driver.  Oh what a performance...passing the phone to the passenger in front of me, who passed it on until it reached the driver.  They had a few words which I couldn't hear, then the phone was passed back to me.

Mr A told me that the driver would take me to the cargo office but that I must be careful as he would have to pull up while I crossed a very busy road to the office.

So...we reached the cargo office.  I got off the bus and diced with death across two dual carriageways to the cargo office, where I collected my book, and took my life in my hands crossing back over the road to the bus.   It took me some time, but no-one minded at all.  I thanked the driver and of course he replied "you're welcome".

I know I've often mentioned the way that the drivers are happy to make detours to drop people off or to collect things for them, but this is the first time I've had it happen to me,and I did feel a little embarrassed about keeping everyone waiting.

I shouldn't have worried.  On the way back to our village, we made two further detours.  One to collect a man and two containers of something or other, and another miles away to one of the other villages in the area which doesn't have a bus service, to drop someone off.

I just love our dolmuş drivers!

The book that I almost didn't receive looks good.  I can't wait to read it.

27 comments:

  1. Wouldn't life be exquisite if everyone had the attitude of that bus driver and your fellow passengers? There is much goodness in the world. I hope you enjoy the book; who would have thought that getting it would be such an adventure...

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    1. parepidemos..yes it would be good if everyone had this attitude. I think if this had been anywhere other than Turkey I may not have ever received the book.

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  2. Another tale to bring a smile to my face which will last all day.... a lovely story Ayak, I hope the book is as good as the adventures it has had reaching you. J.

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  3. I fear that we here in the States are always hurrying, hurrying around. I can't imagine the scene that would have caused here along with all the sighs and complaints from the other passengers. There is something to be said for the "slower Pace" of your village.

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    1. It's much less stressful than all the rushing about Charlotte Ann.

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  4. They seem such helpful men...but I don't envy you crossing that road!

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    1. It was quite scary Fly...you clearly remember what Turkish drivers are like!

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  5. That is a very good service. I am am not sure the bus drivers in a city like Mersin would have so much leeway to make detours though they do drop off and pick up passengers anywhere along their rout, not just at bus stops.

    When I travelled by coach from Istanbul to Mersin (14 hours) once the coach got to Mersin the company provided minibuses at no extra cost to take people almost to their doors.

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    1. Peter I think it's a bit different in the cities. The fact that our village is pretty isolated means that the dolmuş drivers offer more of a service than just taking us from here to Milas. Many people in the village don't have transport, so they rely on the dolmuş drivers for all sorts of things. You could say they are more community workers than drivers really.

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  6. I think it's wonderful your bus service

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    1. I think so too Kv...although it can be a little irritating at times if I'm in a rush. No-one in this village ever seems to be in a rush though!

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  8. I'm tempted to say only in Turkey, Ayak, but I'm sure it happens in other places where people take precedence over timetables. I hope the book is as interesting as the journey it took to reach you. :-)

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    1. Perpetua, I'm pretty sure it must happen in other places too. I have quite a lot of faith in human nature and I believe most people get enormous satisfaction from helping others.

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  9. This is the most fantastic thing ever...I can just imagine an American bus driver making detours off his route to help someone! The nicest thing I ever saw one of our bus drivers do, was actually stop and let someone on who was running beside the bus. And the best part of your saga is that no one on the bus minds, why? probably because at one time or the other it will be them needing the help. When are you writing your book about life in Turkey?

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    1. Theanne. Not only do they not mind, they were all smiling when I returned to the bus..happy that I'd managed to get what I wanted.
      Ah..as for writing a book. Well it has been mentioned before but I really don't think I have the patience or stamina to undertake it. If anyone thought my life here would be worth writing a book about I would love for someone to take my blog, sort it out, and do it for me! So you see..I lack the determination. I'll stick to blogging!

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  10. What an adventure to get the book.....hope it's a good read.Which I'm sure will be....I must show my husband maybe he can get one and read it also. He's a big Ataturk follower.

    It is a slower pace in smaller towns, once when I was in Izmir and in the big bus terminal and our city bus was not coming and people were piling up. They actually confiscated another bus and argued with the driver then everyone ran into that bus. I couldn't believe it.....here they slam the doors while people are still trying to enter the subway train...always in a RUSH.

    Thanks for the enjoyable story...and have a great day!!!!

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  11. Aww thats so lovely, a nice way to live I reckon ... beats here yesterday Ihad to move a man out of my pre booked seat on the train and he gave me such a dirty look and mumbled. Whats wrong with this country!

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    1. I don't know why people are so grumpy about such things Bomb. It can't give them any pleasure.

      (PS. No msn today, can't open emails, laptop keeps switching itself off..hence no contact. Hope yesterday went well..try to catch you tomorrow xx)

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  12. Erica, I'm a great fan of Ataturk too and am pretty sure I will enjoy the book. It's also published in Turkish so your husband could look on the internet for a copy.

    If he has problems finding one, I can sort out the invoice and give you the name of the bookshop in Istanbul that sent mine...although be prepared for it to be sent to the wrong address!

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  13. Hi Ayak - can I put your blog link on my site as an example of great dolmus drivers - I have a post due to go out that is also about dolmus drivers and your post complements it beautifully.
    Annie
    BacktoBodrum@gmail.com

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    1. Of course you can Annie and thankyou. I look forward to your post xx

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  14. What a story! Glad it all worked out :-) Love your new header photo, by the way.

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  15. I love these things about Turkey - a whole new look on "what is important in life". Even in Urgup which is a middle-sized town (as you know) the dolmuses have set times and set routes but often go out of their way to pick up people or drop them off, or wait when someone gets off to nip into a shop and buy a telephone card and gets back on. And yes, it is so nice that nobody grumbles or huffs and puffs.
    Happy reading!
    Vicky

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    1. Hi Vicky. Yes indeed it's one of the joys of living here isn't it?

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