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Friday, 12 April 2013

How to avoid...

....wearing a paper bag over one's head.  Get a much needed haircut.

Easier said than done.  I've blogged several times about haircuts.  I've had a few disasters and I've had some really good cuts, and I've taken some risks with new hairdressers.

I haven't been to the hairdressers since before I went to England at the beginning of December.  I found a good hairdresser in Milas and was very happy with the way he cut my hair.  More than a month ago I phoned to make an appointment with him, to be informed that he wasn't in that day.  I phoned again the following week, to be told the same thing.

The next time we were in Milas, I called in to make an appointment with him.  He wasn't there but an appointment was made for the following day.  I was sure his name was Mehmet, and that's who I asked for.  I knew I had a card somewhere at home with his name on it.  The girl there said, no it's not Mehmet, it's Ahmet.

When I got home I found the card and sure enough, the name was Mehmet.  Mr A phoned to query this and they informed him that Mehmet had left the salon several weeks before.  Why couldn't they have said that in the first place.  I guess they didn't want to lose a customer and hoped I wouldn't notice.  Maybe Ahmet is a good hairdresser.  Who knows?  I cancelled my appointment on principle because I don't like being deceived.

So the weeks go by and my hair is becoming a mess.  It doesn't matter too much during the winter because I never go anywhere and no-one notices in this village, but I'm going to England soon, and I can't do the whole journey wearing a paperbag over my head.

Last Saturday we went into Milas to do some shopping.  We stopped at a pastane that we haven't previously used for tea and puaca.  We parked the motorbike in a narrow side street.  When we returned I noticed a small hair salon opposite.  I don't know why I suddenly decided to go in and ask if  I could get my hair cut, but in the past I have found that many of these tiny backstreet establishments contain the best hairdressers.  There was only one hairdresser, with no assistants, doing everything.  Washing hair, cutting, sweeping up, making tea.  And there were three people waiting patiently.  A good sign.  We were advised to come back in an hour.  So we did our shopping and then returned.

It turns out that this young guy, Umit, lives in our village and is the son of one of Mr A's friends.  And he is a really good hairdresser.  I am very pleased with the result...and it only cost 10 lira (about £3.60).

I'll stick with him...unless he decides to move on elsewhere...in which case it will be back to the paperbag until I find a suitable replacement.

20 comments:

  1. I also don't like being deceived so I would have cancelled too.
    Glad you found such a good hairdresser on the back streets and that it was so reasonable. In fact about the quarter of the cost in our city!
    Maggie x

    Nuts in May

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    1. I can't believe how expensive hairdressers are in the UK these days Maggie. I couldn't justify paying the prices. This one will do nicely.

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  2. and so it goes with hairdressers...they come, mostly they leave :D so happy you found one and that you got an excellent cut (hope he's still available the next time around)!

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    1. I hope so too Theanne, but I won't count on it. I still have a hairdresser in Bodrum in reserve, but it's a long way to go.

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  3. When you find a good hairdresser you need to put a micro chip on them so that you can follow them to their next establishment.

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    1. What an excellent idea Helen. I'll get onto it!

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    2. ask for their mobile number.
      E.G.

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    3. Of course E.G. It's such an obvious solution...why didn't I think of that?

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  4. I'm lucky with mu hairdresser in Bodrum. I've been going to her since 1982!

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    1. That's amazing Annie...having a hairdresser who has stayed in the same place for more than 20 years. I'm sure it must be a record.

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  5. I need an Umit, Ayak! Like yours, my hair hasn't been cut since before Christmas and now it's sooo shaggy. I usually cut my own, but I feel in need of a professional cut if only I could find a hairdresser I trust at a price that doesn't make me wince. Let's hope Umit stays in business where you can reach him for a long time.

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    1. I hope so too Perpetua. Shame I can't get him to pop over to you x

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  6. Totally agree that the best hairdressers are in the backstreets. I have two barbers within walking distance. The nearest one is a high class place and cost me 25 lira. No frills, cut and in and out within 20 minutes max. The further place is one guy, who cuts with precision every hair, treats my hair as if he is sculpting a master piece, supplies me with coffee, and a quick shoulder massage! - cost 10 lira!...

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    1. My husband also uses a backstreet barber Westy. They really do take so much care and pride in their work.

      Unfortunately we pay for the premises and decor with the high class establishments, and not necessarily a good haircut.

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  7. My hair is so awful that hairdressers often move away on purpose if I go more than twice. I have some lovely paper bags that I couldn't live without and will send you some should Umit disappear at any time in the future.
    Axxx

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    1. You are funny Annie. I'm sure your hair isn't that bad! I'll let you know if I lose track of Umit so you can send me some of your lovely bags xx

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  8. I love the backstreet places too. I've been going to one near my house for a couple of years. I just got back from there, where I got all the hair ripped out of my face-- eyebrow shaping (don't ask me why I ever got into doing that) and a lip and chin wax (the beard and mustache are courtesy of having a baby) for 10tl. She does a great job, with the thread and the meticulousness.

    Metin was the haircutting guy for a long time and he's been there this whole time. He does a fine job. Then they got this new guy who's even better-- just out of hairdressing school and I don't think he'll be around for long. He uses a razor and scissors and is cute as a button. A haircut and wash is 10 or 15tl, I can't remember. But now that I've found a good place here, I don't even get it done at home anymore-- a decent haircut and face-ripping would be close to $100!

    I still prefer pedicures in the States, though. It's cheaper here, but not much more than I could do myself. I love the Korean and Vietnamese places at home...

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    1. I love a bit of face ripping too Stranger. Mine needs a good sort out at the moment (my facial hair courtesy of getting older), but Umit is a one man band and no sign of a woman there, and it's usually women who do the threading/..I'll have to ask him to recommend someone.

      I haven't had a pedicure for years and my feet are a disgrace. I really need to do something about them soon.

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  9. I finally found someone I like doing my hair here. But I am very bad at the pampering stuff (any kind of anything being done to me) - I hate it. But hair cutting here is much better than it is in the UK. My last UK hairdresser was from Izmir and understood what I wanted. He also didn't charge an arm and a leg.

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    1. Hilary, it makes you wonder how hairdressers in the UK can justify the ridiculous prices they charge.

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