Wednesday, 18 September 2013

Day 10...still waiting

Yes...it's now 10 days without water.  I know I must be smelly, even though I am washing every day.  At least I feel as if I am.  Although, there are an awful lot of other smells around the village now.

No water means that cow and sheep sheds are not being washed out daily as they usually would.   I am sure I can smell the septic tank.  Most likely because not enough water is being flushed in the toilet.   I am pouring bleach into the sinks and drains but it doesn't seem to help get rid of unpleasant smells.

My friend Fleur was due to visit today.  Unfortunately she has had to postpone because her daughter is unwell.  But I would be embarrassed to receive guests here at the moment.  Hopefully by the time she comes, we will be back to normal.

Yesterday I popped on to the village Facebook page to see if there had been any response to the message left by the guy in Izmir several days ago, requesting help.  Nothing.  In any case I would certainly have noticed any offers of help, and so would my neighbours.  

However I took the opportunity to post a comment to this effect.  I was joined by the guy from Izmir, and another lady who lives in Izmir, but comes to stay with her family in the house next to Sevke.  She has been here for less than a week.  She had intended to stay longer but found it difficult with no water.   The three of us, plus another girl, had a lengthy conversation in Turkish and English about how disgusted we are at the state of things.  How we have no confidence in the Muhtar.  The way in which Turkish people are scared to stand up to those in authority, exacerbated by what is going on in the country as a whole.  Peaceful demonstrators being attacked and killed by police.   A dictator who is a bully and now has the people of this country living in fear.

I have to admit that a lot of this was said by me, but I certainly had agreement and support from those joining in the conversation.  I even jokingly suggested that I might stage a peaceful protest in front of the Muhtar's office, but that I would probably be the only one protesting.

The Izmir guy and the lady also from Izmir both phoned the department at the council in Milas  who are carrying out the work under instruction from the Muhtar, then they posted the telephone number on the page so that others (if so inclined) could also ring to express their concerns.   The department agreed to send an engineer out to inspect the work and progress.

As a result, it was then established from the Muhtar that the work was almost finished and that water MAY be flowing again by tomorrow( Thursday).   We'll see!  

In the meantime, I am curious as to whether the Muhtar has read the comments on Facebook, and what reaction I might expect when I next see him!

14 comments:

  1. I can't believe the government is allowing this to take so long. Seems like such a health advantage, but this is one thing I know as Americans we probably take advantage. Hope you get your water back soon. When do you leave for England?

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    1. I leave on 1st October Kelleyn, so just less than 2 weeks. I hope the water is back well before then as the washing is piling up, and I'll have nothing to wear!

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  2. Keep up the gentle but insistent action, Ayak. It's dreadful that people cannot express their opinion without fear. And incredible that a village full of people can be expected to manage without water for 10 days...and counting. Fingers crossed for tomorrow.

    Axxx

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    1. Thanks Annie. I bumped into the Muhtar in the village this morning. He normally stops for a chat, but this time he just said good morning and asked me when my husband was back......hmmmm!

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  3. Given a dictatorship those already apathetic will be careful not to oppose even petty authority.
    I do hope the water returns on Thursday.

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    1. I hope so too Helen.

      I feel quite sad for the people of this country. They seem to have the spirit knocked out of them :-(

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  4. 10 days. How dreadful. Dreadful for a western nation. I know many survive without but when it's a key part of your infrastructure, it's just not on.

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    1. And coming up to day 11 KV. My poor neighbour Dursune has asked me at least a dozen times today if it's coming back tomorrow,and each time I say maybe but I'm not sure, and each time she replies Insallah. I hope it will be back tomorrow if only to shut her up :-)

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  5. This is quite unbelievable. I think you should get your friends Jane or Charlotte to write about it in the newspapers they have contacts with. Not so much the fact of the water being cut off but that the Muhtar has not arranged for water to be delivered to the older members of the community.

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    1. Yes that's a thought BtoB...I'll give that serious consideration.

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  6. I really don`t know how you have managed Linda. I think I would have been in a straight jacket by now. Water and electricity are a basic human right. Your Muhtar doesn`t care about the people in the village, but I doubt anyone will complain to him. Turks just shrug their shoulder`s, they are so used to doing without.
    I do agree with you, that Turks never stand up to anyone who works for the local council or government offices. My late husband always said if you complain or argue, they just make things worse and you cannot get your business done. How sad is that? These people`s salaries are paid by the Turkish tax payer and they receive jobs for life and better pensions, yet they rarely work, always drinking tea or taking smoking breaks. I am determined to learn more Turkish, because I won`t stand for this kind of behaviour, it makes me seethe. Charlotte`s deputy head was shocked that I stood up to him, most parents are in awe, but not me. I hate unfairness and I don`t like to be spoken to or treated like dirt. I remember being in the SSK office in Aydin trying to sort out my widows pension. There was an old man in front of me and the guy who was dealing with him was terrible rude. When it came to my turn, he was ever so nice. I made sure first he sorted out my problem, then I let rip and told him in no uncertain terms with my then limited Turkish what I thought of his treatment of the old man. He looked sheepish after I threatened to speak to his superior, then he admitted he was a bit hard on him.
    The people here think they have no rights and now I know this is true after all the demonstrations around the country. Unless you keep your head down, do as you are told and agree with everything, you are likely to end up in prison. F.X

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    1. Fleur, I couldn't agree with you more. Everything you say is true. All those thousands of people who peacefully protested made me feel so proud. They at last had the courage to speak out. It was a long time coming, and I think we all hoped it would make a difference. It did of course, but not in the way we expected it to. A sad state of affairs.

      The water is still off, although I wasn;t optimistic about it returning today.

      I've emailed you by the way xx

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  7. You go, girl! Someone has to speak out and tell it as it really is. I do hope you don't have much longer to wait.

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