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Wednesday, 30 October 2013

It's good to be helpful...isn't it?

Yesterday was market day in Milas.  We are economising as much as we can now that Mr A isn't working, so we try to go into Milas just once a week and do everything we need to do during that trip.

We were just passing the large Carrefour supermarket on the outskirts of the town when we spotted a woman sprawled out in front of the supermarket.  Mr A slammed on the brakes and we both rushed over to help her.  There is a ridiculously low metal barrier along the front of the shop which is dangerous.  The woman had tripped over it and fallen quite heavily.  I have tripped over it  myself before now and I am sure countless others have done the same.

Having established that she had not lost consciousness and was able to sit up, we helped her to her  feet.  I stayed with her and Mr A went off to find her husband in the supermarket.  He emerged 10 minutes later and they got into their car. 

We got into our truck...but didn't drive off.. Having braked so hard, the starter motor had jammed.   Mr A ran back to the man and woman in the car and asked the man if he could give us a push so that we could get the truck going.   "Sorry, we are in a hurry"  he replied, and with no word of thanks for helping his wife, and an unwillingness to help us, off he drove.

Mr A crossed the road to where two men were working on a building site and asked them to help.  Sorry, they were busy and couldn't leave their work.  Eventually a waiter from a nearby restaurant came out and gave us a push.   We then had to drive to a repair shop and have a new starter motor fitted.

If we hadn't braked so hard to stop and give assistance to someone who needed it, perhaps we wouldn't have had a problem with the car.   Nevertheless, it does make you wonder sometimes whether we should be so willing to help others.

27 comments:

  1. You know the Turkish saying, "Do a favour and throw it in the sea" - I'm convinced those favours bounce back and hit to do-gooder on the head.

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    1. Hmm...I hadn't heard that one before BtoB

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  2. Nowt so queer as folk Ayak! It's unbelievable how some people behave. Never ceases to amaze me.

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    1. Yes it surprises me at times Jacqui

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  3. The granddaughter and I headed to the mall a few days ago as she was on holiday from her classes (Carrie is 8yrs old). The car stalled and died just a few hundred yards from that mall. A young man in a truck behind me got out and offered help...soon another young man came up and asked if I wanted him to use his TripleA card and call a wrecker and still yet, my neighbor heading back from the mall saw us and stopped and stayed with me until the husband arrived. After calling the wrecker truck to tow the car, yet another young man showed up to help us shove the car back off the road so the wrecker driver could hook onto the car. As I was watching, another man appeared on the walkway to watch the tow guy load my car up...I had just seen this tall man in the shop Carrie and I were in an hour ago....he was the store security guard..plain clothes watching for shoplifters! It was quite the morning and I had no idea so many people would be willing to help. This city boasts about 200,000 in population!.

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    1. Isn't that lovely Charlotte. So many people stopping to help restores ones faith in human nature x

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    2. Yes Linda..I was pleasantly surprised at my fellow man!

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  4. You two wouldn't be you two if you hadn't stopped to help....but isn't it just typical that something will go wrong if it possibly can!

    Leo doesn't have good balance and has frrequently fallen in town...every time people have come rushing to help...even stopping their car, like you, and offering to take him to hospital.
    I've been so grateful to them for their kindness.

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    1. It's an instinctive thing isn't it? I couldn't just pass by if someone needed help and to be honest the behaviour this time quite shocked me as Turkish people are usually quite the opposite.

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  5. What a crazy story! I seriously can't believer they couldn't help you in return. I guess this has been going on since Bible times though because remember the story of hte good Samaritan. No one could help the man who was robbed.

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    1. It's perhaps a sign of the times Kelleyn, that people are in so much of a rush or too wrapped up in their own lives that they don't seem to have time for others.

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  6. I can imagine how frustrated and basically disappointed you must have felt by these people's reactions. However, I suppose you and Mr A would do exactly the same thing again if you saw someone in distress. Some folk are strange ! I hope the truck is ok now. Jx

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    1. Janice I was disappointed because I haven't really experienced this type of reaction from Turks before. They usually put themselves out to help others, so this was a surprise.

      The truck is OK now thank goodness, although just another expense which we could do without!

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  7. One of my friends chopped his hand to the point of almost off (he had a lot of surgery and a long time in hospital). But when it happened a neighbour saw him, in a bad state, went inside and shut his door. My friend had to stagger to another house to shout for help. The people in that house were the best. Some do and some don't. Karma will play out. x

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    1. That's just awful KV. How can someone just walk away from something like that? Yes I believe in karma x

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  8. My jaw dropped...literally...when the couple didn't offer to return your help. It definitely wasn't the right way to behave and as you say, quite unusual. It's good to be helpful and I know if you saw someone else sprawling on the ground, you'd do the same again I'd like to think I would too. Axxx

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    1. Of course I would Annie, and I'm sure you would too. I like to think that these people are the exception rather than the rule x

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  9. That's terrible that you helped someone and they in return couldn't bother with you.....well I believe strongly in 'karma'. Hope your truck is okay...and really did you need to spend some more money on something else. :-(

    Yes I noticed in a Migros near our apartment in Izmir they have a 'dare devil' exit, especially of you have bags of groceries. The steps aren't even and the banister swings around and this summer I saw some of the steps have chunks carved out of them. Here you can make some money out of a lawsuit. hehehe.

    Hope everything is all well.....and just think of it as another adventurous day for you. XX

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    1. Health and safety laws don't seem to exist here Erica. There are dangers everywhere. Uneven pavements etc...I always have to keep my eyes on the ground when I'm walking. If I don't I generally trip over!

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  10. As my grandparents would always remind me "There's nowt so queer as folk" and some are definitely queerer than others, Ayak. Sorry that your kindness wasn't reciprocated, but glad you managed to get help at last.

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    1. I just have to remind myself that not everyone's the same Perpetua x

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  11. Oh Linda, what a day for you? I think Turks have changed a lot in recent years. I always found them helpful years ago, but know they are few and far between.
    Most of the supermarkets don`t have non slip tiles which are a hazard. I take my life in my hands when I go to my local Kipa (which I hate), it is like being on skis.
    Hopefully, your truck will last a good while without the need to put your hands in your pockets. Love, F.XX

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    1. Yes Fleur..just another day in paradise :-) I agree about the tiles everywhere...and outside as well as in the shops...treacherous when it rains.

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  12. Hoping for a bit of good luck for you and Mr A soon xxx

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  13. Oh, now I am feeling horribly guilty as I walked past a woman who had passed out near the airport yesterday. Though she was surrounded by people (friends and family I think) who were helping her already... Still, I did feel bad just walking by (looking for our transfer home).

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    1. If there are already people gathered to help I don't think you should feel guilty. I sometimes think it's worse when too many people stop to help. It can be a bit overwhelming for the person concerned. I'm afraid the Turks are a nation of rubberneckers, in my experience. They will stop and WATCH the results of a traffic accident for example, and do nothing to help

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