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Saturday, 19 October 2013

Life goes on

Being away from home for a couple of weeks always makes me appreciate the life I have.

I do take it all very much for granted, and I moan about a lot of things.  The useless Muhtar, the rubbish, the bad roads, grumpy neighbours, etc.  But there's still nothing quite like being back in my familiar surroundings, with Mr A, my lovely dogs, and the beautiful scenery.

I chose a good day to travel back.  It was the first day of Kurban Bayram, so most Turks had done their travelling on Monday, and the Turkish Airlines flights were not full, giving me a whole row of 3 seats on each flight, so that I could spread out.

As usual my suitcase was heavy.  My brother does my airport runs and even though he has been off work for 3 weeks with severe back pain, he still insisted on driving me to the airport.  Of course I wouldn't allow him to lift my suitcase into and out of the car, and that was fine.  However, when I was checking in, I lifted it onto the conveyor belt, without moving the trolley.  I leaned over at an awkward angle and put my back out, and it's been giving me trouble ever since.  I also have a nasty cold, with earache, headache and sore throat, probably picked up on the flight.  The confines of an aircraft cabin are brilliant for spreading germs.

But in spite of my ailments it's great to be back home in my own bed.

As I arrived home late afternoon, I managed to miss the slaughter of animals.  I do try to avoid it every year.  Although we all have differing views on this tradition, I don't object to it.   I don't rant and rave on Facebook about how barbaric it is, like so many others do, who usually don't really understand the meaning of it.   Yes, it's a religious festival, and I am not religious.  But I respect others' beliefs.  I also look at the wider picture, and many people, who normally struggle, are fed at this time.  I eat meat so I don't see how I have the right to object.  And I gratefully received two lots of lamb from friends in the village.

Last night  Mr A was on his way to the teahouse and stopped to help a couple of men deliver a calf.   He wanted me to experience it, but it was all so hectic and there was no time to call me, but he was so full of joy at seeing the cow clean her calf and welcome it into the world and couldn't stop talking about it.

It seemed rather poignant that after the slaughter of so many animals this week, this tiny animal was born on the last day of Bayram.   Life goes on.

18 comments:

  1. You also missed all the cold weather here - a good move.

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    1. It's certainly been very pleasant since I returned BtoB

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  2. You sound happy and content, despite all the recent problems, your cold, bad back etc. Coming home, even after a lovely time with family, is so good. Mr A's joy over the birth of the calf, and the brilliant photo are also causes for big smiles. Hopefully, the rest of the autumn and winter will be a good time for you and Mr A. Jx

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    1. I hope so Janice. Having him around makes me feel like we are having a more normal life.

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  3. Our Turkish builders used to give us a shoulder, too.

    It always used to amaze me how, with all the controls in place, they and their friends could buy and slaughter sheep out in the country with no come back from the authorities.

    I just bet you are glad to be home....the familiar suddenly becomes precious again, doesn't it.

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    1. Yes it does Helen. I imagine the controls were much tighter in France than here, so it is surprising they could get away with it.

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  4. what a lovely post, I enjoyed reading it. cheers Ayak from Loretta from Scotland

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    1. Hello Loretta. Thankyou. Glad you enjoyed it x

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  5. Welcome back Ayak, so happy to read your blogs again.
    The photo of the calf is so lovely.
    I am glad Bayram is over. I don`t object per se because people who don`t normally eat meat because of the cost do enjoy a good feed, what I do object to is the practice of unskilled people slaughtering animals and causing untold suffering. Despite this being outlawed it still continues.
    I saw a family butchering what was left of sheep the first day not far from my house.
    I was in two minds to call the Zabita, but I know they would do nothing.
    Taking young children to watch this terrible scene is something I will never accept.
    As soon as I am able, I will come down to Milas to see you.XXX F

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    1. I do agree Fleur. I'm sure, like me, you remember the days when there seemed little or no control over the slaughter and I witnessed some heartbreaking sights at the hands of unskilled "butchers". I also don't agree with allowing children to watch. I'm sure many of them must be traumatised. Things are changing gradually and many people now donate to charity instead of sacrificing an animal. A much better idea I feel.

      Looking forward to seeing you soon xx

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  6. So sorry you picked up unnecessary bugs and back strain on your journey - but like you, I'm glad to be back after a lovely break. I have mssed my home on this particular visit. Lovely ending and a beautiful picture of newborn calf... take care and get well soon. Axxx

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    1. Thanks Annie. Hope you have been enjoying your trip. I love the picture of the calf too x

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  7. Welcome home!

    We'll be doing four flights over the next couple of weeks. I'm going to miss my home and, when we get back, it will have started to get cold.

    I was glad, though, not to miss Kurban Bayram. Although we don't celebrate it ourselves, there was much coming and going amongst the neighbours and a good time being had by all.

    It must be lovely seeing a new calf come into the world!

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    1. Thanks omentide. I don't envy you having to fly so much in a short space of time. I don't mind the actual flying. It's all the waiting about that gets to me. I wish there had been time for me to see the calf born but it was over too fast for Mr A to let me know. At least he managed a photo though z

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  8. If the slaughter was being done by professionals, I can't see how there could be many objections from those like me who eat meat, but the thought of amateurs slaughtering in their back garden does worry me.

    Sorry to hear about the back strain and the almost inevitable cold, courtesy of the plane's air-conditioning, but as you say it's lovely to be back home in one's own bed. The photo of the calf is gorgeous. There's just something about very new life....

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    1. I'm always concerned about the amateurs slaughtering Perpetua. The law is in place to stop this, but the villages do tend to be ignored. Although I do stop and think about abattoirs in the UK and they leave a lot to be desired.

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  9. Glad you are safely back.
    Oh I couldn't cope with the slaughter.
    Wonderful how life goes on with the baby calf!
    Maggie x

    Nuts in May

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    1. Thanks Maggie. I avoid witnessing the slaughter. I don't know how people can gather to watch. I hope in time that the tradition will cease and that more people will give to charity instead.

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