Tuesday, 19 November 2013

A little more scandal from the village

Following on from a previous post about murder and mayhem which you can read HERE I'm gradually accumulating more snippets about the activities here.

It seems to be all about the women.  The men of course are mostly too busy getting drunk, or languishing in the teahouses.  But occasionally something happens which gets them out of their chairs.

I've known for a while that there are prostitutes in the village because Mr A told me.  Occasionally when driving up the lanes to our house, he would point out one of the ladies of the night and I'd be quite surprised because I'd never have guessed.   I don't know what I expect them to look like.  They are hardly going to be tottering up these uneven lanes in mini-skirts and stilettos are they?  I should try to stop myself thinking of stereotypes.

Mr A is a bit of a prude really and although he hasn't exactly led a sheltered life, he is easily shocked and disgusted by things.  It makes me smile when he tells me something that he considers to be shocking and I don't bat an eyelid. 

When I first moved here and started getting the dolmus into town, the ladies of the village would chat to me on the bus, asking me the usual questions about where I came from, what was my name, how long I'd been married, how many children, etc.  One lady in particular who lives in the centre of the village was very nice.  She realised my Turkish wasn't very good and always spoke very slowly so that I could grasp what she was saying.   I'm afraid I don't remember her name, which is bad of me, because she  always remembers mine.  Every time I see her she says Merhaba Linda, and usually sits next to me on the bus.  I'll call her Melek for the purposes of this post (although the meaning of the name.... "angel" is probably slightly inappropriate.

Anyway, I like her. 

One evening, a couple of weeks ago, Mr A was at the teahouse as usual chatting with his friends and playing Okey and cards.  Melek went into the shop next to the teahouse and one of the men called out something to her.  Mr A wouldn't tell me what he said, but he was at that point informed by one of his friends that Melek was one of the village prostitutes.   She retaliated by asking the man where his wife was, and what she was up to, insinuating that she was following a similar occupation to hers.

The man rose from his chair and threw a glass at her, which fortunately missed.  There was much shouting and waving of arms and Melek stormed off saying that she would fetch her "boyfriend" to sort him out.  The man also left the teahouse.  Melek returned with three men.  The man returned with about a dozen men.   A fight broke out.  Even men in the teahouse who had nothing to do with the incident got caught up in the fighting, including Mr A.   Bloody Turkish men...how they love a good fight.  I guess it relieves the boredom.

The jandarma were called and they were all carted off to Milas (including Mr A).  The incident was explained and all but those directly involved in the incident were released.

I don't know if anyone was charged, but Mr A has informed me that I should have nothing to do with Melek and should ignore her if she speaks to me, as she is a troublemaker.  I suggested that perhaps the man who called something out to her was the troublemaker.  I also told him that no-one tells me who I should or should not talk to.  I make those decisions for myself.  I don't just stop talking to someone who has caused me no harm, and has been nothing but kind to me since I came to live here.  Her occupation is none of my business and it doesn't make her a bad person....far from it.

19 comments:

  1. Priceless, Ayak! Your village is anything but boring.... and you tell it all beautifully. I've been sniggering into my cereal this morning. As for a husband who knows all the prostitutes and has been carted off to the police station recently...should I be changing my view of Mr A??

    Hugs, Axxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha Annie. If I didn't know him so well I would wonder how he knows who all the prostitutes so well! He'd run a mile if one approached him...anyway he never has any money :-) He does love to be in the thick of things though, particularly when there's a fight going on

      Delete
  2. Wow, a super post Linda and it had me in stitches. Like you, no one tells me who I can speak to and she seems a nice woman despite her profession which I doubt she relishes, probably needs money like everyone else and has no other skills. I try not to judge people because it is not my place and the person is more important. She is friendly and accepting which is good.
    I would love to have been a fly on the wall in the teahouse when all mayhem broke loose.
    Never a dull moment in Turkey, but your village takes the biscuit!!!
    Love. F.XXX

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She is nice Fleur and I like her. I couldn't give two hoots what she does. It's no business of mine, and I don't judge people either

      I wonder why I used to think that nothing ever happened in this village. I must have been walking around with my eyes closed x

      Delete
  3. that made me *snort*! You wouldn't have thought there was much call for her trade in a village but I guess it's everywhere. Rotten job I think, but if she's got the ability to carry it off then that's her choice. At least I hope it's a choice. Puts you in a difficult position when Mr A tells you do do something that goes against what you know to be the right thing to do. Men!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think (but also hope) it's her choice KV. Oh Mr A knows he is wasting his time telling me what to do. He knows I ignore him :-)

      Delete
  4. Oh..the 'shame' thing again.....

    Pity the men aren't more ashamed of themselves.....

    But I did giggle at the teahouse fight and all the chaps carted off by the jandarma...it's amazing what goes on in these 'quiet' little places.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Helen. I certainly think in this case, and more often than not, the men should feel ashamed.

      These men sit from dawn till dusk in the teahouses. It has to be pretty boring, so I think a good fight livens things up.

      Delete
  5. Years and years ago, on the way to Izmir, my attention was drawn to a village where it was said all the women were prostitutes and the men oil wrestlers - I so hoped it was true but never had the nerve to go and investigate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh the mind boggles BtoB! Maybe we'll go together one day and investigate :-)

      Delete
  6. It's awfully easy to tar an independent woman with a name that belittles her, so of course you should stick to your guns and talk to her. Let's be honest, if there were no willing customers, prostitution would die out.

    The teahouse scene sounds like the stuff of farce and makes me giggle just to read about it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perpetua, the men in the teahouse sit and watch the world go by, and do nothing useful. Remember when they sat and watched elderly women struggle with water containers when our water was off for several weeks? It seems that a good fight is the only thing that stirs them into action.

      . We stopped at the shop yesterday and "Melek" was there. She said hello and I replied as usual...and so did Mr A. I asked why he had had a change of heart and he said whatever she does, we shouldn't stop talking to her...Haha sometimes I manage to get through to him!

      Delete
  7. This was priceless Ayak, who would have thought all this is going on in such a small village. Good for you, for sticking to your principles - as you say her profession is her own business & I don't suppose she had many career choices.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No I doubt she has tricia. I don't discriminate. I take people at face value. If they are nice to me, then I treat them the same way.

      Delete
  8. The drama of the Queen Vic and the Rovers Return have nothing on the escalating drama at your local tea house! It smothered my face with a wry smile!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never a dull moment in this village Jay x

      Delete
  9. You said it, never a dull moment ! I have a feeling that village life is actually quite similar all over the world. There were some pretty amusing/strange goings on in the little 14 house hamlet I lived in in Yorkshire.....and as for Caunes....well, as I have now been her for approaching 4 years...the stories are emerging ! Jx

    ReplyDelete

I love getting comments, but don't feel obliged...I'm just happy you're reading my blog.

Posts are moderated to avoid spam, so if you post under "Anonymous",leave your name at the end of your comment so that I know it's a "real" person!.

If you would like to help my rescue dogs and the strays (dogs and cats) of our village and local industrial estate, please email me for details at lindaikaya@hotmail.com Thankyou x