Saturday, 15 February 2014

Family members I can trust

I should have had a colonoscopy yesterday.  I cancelled the procedure on Thursday.  I didn't chicken out, because I had one 7 years ago and knew what to expect, but I took advice from my sister-in-law.

I saw a doctor at the hospital last week because I was experiencing pains in my stomach and back.   BEFORE he examined me, he told me to book a colonoscopy.  I then had blood and urine tests and an ultrasound.   I was expecting it to show an infection, which I have had a couple of times before, which have been cleared up within days with antibiotics, but the tests all came back clear.  No problems anywhere.  My ovaries were also checked and nothing untoward there either.

However, the doctor still told me to book the colonoscopy.  I just went along with it, but something was nagging in the back of my mind.  I wondered if it was really necessary.

My sister-in-law, E, is an orthopaedic surgeon and head of her department.  If Mr A or I have had to see a doctor at any time, we usually phone her afterwards and send her copies of any test results and prescriptions for medication.  Those of you who live in Turkey will know that doctors here have a tendency to over-prescribe on medication, and it is often more to do with what they are paid by the drugs companies than anything else.  E has always told us to be wary of this.   I'm not a great believer in pumping too many drugs into my body, so E will always tell me what is necessary and what is not.

We phoned her on Wednesday, read out the test results and she was concerned that a colonoscopy was suggested before any examination and results of tests were to hand, and looking at these she felt that the procedure was unnecessary. She said that too many quick and easy procedures are performed these days...it's all about money again.

She can of course access my medical records through her hospital computer so this is what she did yesterday and phoned last night.  Weighing it all up, she feels it is all connected to the IBS, and that these cramp like pains are often brought on by stress, or in previous instances by an infection and are easily dealt with.  As there was no indication of infection this time, and the fact that the symptoms have now completely disappeared, stress was probably the cause this time.  Another factor is my diet.  I have to own up to having eaten so much unhealthy rubbish in recent months, and this has to change.   She has suggested some medication to take when I get another flare-up, which incidentally is the same as that previously suggested by my trusted eczane in Milas, whose wife suffers from the same condition.  She says that if I take these tablets and it doesn't solve the problem,  only then should I have a colonoscopy.

I don't have a particularly close relationship with Mr A's family.  I'm thankful for this when it comes to my father-in-law, but others in the family are lovely.  Unfortunately they all live so far away that we rarely see them.  My brother-in-law is an expert on computers, and if I have a problem, he will deal with it over the phone,  take control of it and fix it.  Mr A has cousins who are teachers, a dentist who did some work on Mr A's teeth a few years ago when he was working in the area where he lives, a solicitor,  and of course his sister, E.    They are always there on the other end of the phone to give advice when we need it.

 E and my brother-in-law in particular, always consider me as family and will do anything to help.  As my father-in-law has always treated me as an outsider, it's reassuring to know I am accepted by other family members that I can trust.





10 comments:

  1. Over medication and tests seem the order of the day here - however in the UK I found that GPs were reluctant to test. If you are feeling better then postponing further tests is probably the best option.

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    1. Yes I think so BtoB. It's all to easy to get swept along with all these tests, assuming one is doing the right thing. I'm glad we have my sister-in-law on hand to check whether they are really necessary.

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  2. This is really good news and very reassuring, Ayak. It seems health care is either unnecessary poking and prodding or leaving things too long.
    How good to have a sensible and qualified sister-in-law who can offer you such help - I'm glad you haven't had to have such an invasive investigation for no real reason.
    Take care and eat well!
    Axxx

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    1. I'm not against any procedure if it's absolutely necessary Annie, but at this point in time if my sister-in-law says it's unnecessary then I trust her judgment. Now to the eating well...I am really going to try...honestly! xxx

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  3. With the Caja (NHS) here, the attitude is that if you need a test you get it....but only if you need it. Doctors are expected to use their common sense and diagnostic skills.

    In the private hospitals - as you can imagine - it's tests galore!

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    1. Yes I can imagine Helen, and this is what has happened here I think. We usually use the devlet (state) hospital, but this time, more for convenience, ie less queues etc we used the private hospital, because we are still covered by our government insurance, but pay extra amounts on top of this. The extra is not too expensive unless you need extensive treatment, and I wonder if I was just being but on the merry-go-round and who knows what would be next on the list.

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  4. Glad that you didn't need to go through all that discomfort of having the test done.
    Seems it was just IBS that was playing up. I also get this and it is really uncomfortable with bloating.
    Maggie x

    Nuts in May

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    1. Yes it can be quite unpleasant at times Maggie xx

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  5. I've always found the NHS has tested when it seemed necessary, but not just for the sake of testing. You're very fortunate to have someone in the family with expert medical knowledge and whom you obviously like and trust. I'm sure she will tell you if she feels the test becomes necessary.

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    1. It's always difficult knowing whether the right things are being done when one doesn't always grasp what's being said in a different language, so yes it is very reassuring to have my sister-in-law on hand to seek advice from xx

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