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Wednesday, 16 July 2014

And so the battle continues

I had hoped by now to have something positive to report concerning the recent batch of dogs in the village.  But things don't get any better.

Mr A came home again on Monday evening with the intention of trying to round up some of the dogs, at least the six puppies anyway, put them in the car and take them to a shelter.  We just want them to be safe.  The shelters are by no means ideal, but Mr A has been talking to people in the village and there have been threats.  People don't want the dogs here and I'm afraid they are just as likely to shoot them than try to find somewhere else for them to go.

He spent a couple of hours trying to coax the dogs and to capture them, but to no avail.  He spoke to the Muhtar and told him that he should contact the Belediye manager and get the Milas shelter to agree to take them.  To be honest, Mr A wasn't hopeful that the Milas shelter would agree, even though by law it is their responsibility, and if he had managed to get hold of some of the dogs he would have taken them out of the area to any shelter that would have taken them.

Yesterday he contacted the Belediye manager in Milas, who was very unhelpful.  He then spoke to the Governor of the Province in Mugla who promised to do something about it and contact Mr A today (Wednesday).  At the time of writing this he has heard nothing, and will ring back himself by the end of the day.

This morning I went down to the village to catch the 8.30am bus into Milas.  I took some more dogfood.  There were only two dogs in the school playground where they seem to be gathering in recent days.  I put down the food, and filled up several water containers.  As I was doing this I saw the Muhtar approach.  He was standing on the other side of the fence to the schoolyard, and was joined by 4 other men.  They all stood and watched me, and I refused to allow any eye contact but just carried on with the task at hand.

I came out of the yard just as the bus was arriving.  I started to get on the bus and the Muhtar tapped me on the shoulder and started to ramble on about the dogs, the Belediye, etc.  He was speaking so fast (and loudly) that I didn't entirely grasp what he said.  But I was angry that he did this in front of a bus full of people, and I just told him to talk to my husband.

I phoned Mr A who phoned the Muhtar.   Mr A then told me that the Muhtar said that he (Mr A) should come home tonight and catch the dogs and remove them.  Who the hell does he think he is?  Well, of course, he's the head of the village, voted in at the last election, but he clearly is not doing his job.  Why is he not getting the Belediye shelter to take the dogs?  Why should Mr A have to keep buying petrol to come here and try to deal with the problem?

And why the hell should it be a problem anyway?  We are feeding the dogs.  I have already told the Muhtar that we will try to spay all the females over time, to stop the increase in population.  I don't know what else we can do.   If Mr A decides to come home to catch some of the dogs (which I suspect he will) then he can't do it without help and proper equipment.  He will need tranquillisers, strong choke leads to catch and restrain them, and help in getting them to the shelter.

Why can't these ignorant people see that the dogs are no threat as long as they are looked after, which we are prepared to do?

It's a real dilemma and I have no idea how to resolve it.  I'm just hoping that my next blog will be one where I will have some answers and something positive to report.

9 comments:

  1. So sorry this is all so difficult for you. You need to be dealing with way above the Muhtar. His view is too narrow, and even if he knows the law, doesn't look like he's going to help enforcing it. Have you spoken to Vali in Mugla? There is a general policy and laws to care for street dogs, and you need support from a level that a) knows the law and b) is willing to give positive support. Do you have copies of the law concerning the care of street animals? If not I can put you in touch with Jane Kenny who will have a copy. I really think you are wasting time with the locals, Your only problem of course is MrA and you have to live there - and I know from being married to a local Turk myself, that you have to weigh up the unpleasantness of upsetting the locals against just following what you believe in. We both suffered such unpleasantness, over stopping the shooting of wild birds here, but we did succeeded and eventually got respect for it. Believe in what you are doing. Liz Cakir

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    1. Hi Liz. Yes as I mentioned my husband spoke to the governor in Mugla two days ago. He was supposed to call back yesterday but didn't. We have copies of the law, both in Turkish and English, and these have been quoted...for what it's worth. I agree that there is a fine line between upsetting the locals and continuing with what we believe in. I will do a blog post today with an update. Thanks Liz xx

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  2. As always with these people...can't or won't think through a problem, won't accept responsibility and end up blaming the 'outsider' for making the problem obvious....reminds me so much of France...
    I do hope that there is some response from the Governor.

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    1. No response from the governor Helen...which comes as no surprise. We are finding a way of dealing with it as of last night, and I'll update later today xx

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  3. This attitude of the locals makes me so angry and they should not be intimidating you, they should be helping resolve the situation, but the old cliche, this is Turkey!
    I hope you do find a solution and soon. What a difficult time you are having.
    Sending big hugs.xx F.

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  4. It is amazing to me that these officials expect you to do something about it! They aren't your dogs and all you are trying to do is help. It should be their responsibity. They need to do a better job of educating the locals so that you aren't in this situation to begin with! I know the issue is money, but it would be cheaper in the long run if they would do the right thing from the start. I am so impressed that you do all you can given your limited budget.

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    1. Kelleyn you have really summed it up. It is their responsibility, and yes its about money, but in the long term it will save them money if they get all the street dogs neutered. And education is very important. We have tried to arrange to talk to children in the village school, but there is opposition to this too. I'm about to do an update, and hopefully we have reached some sort of compromise.

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  5. It would be great if they went ahead with a new dog shelter and appointed Mr.A as caretaker. F.xxx

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    1. It would be great Fleur. I'm afraid it was probably all pre-election talk if the current non-response is anything to go by. xx

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If you would like to help my rescue dogs and the strays (dogs and cats) of our village and local industrial estate, please email me for details at lindaikaya@hotmail.com Thankyou x